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Winning on Tour – hot putter is key

27th May 2019 | Sunshine Tour

Winning on Tour – hot putter is key

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Winning on Tour – hot putter is key

The debate around which aspects of one’s game – putting, approach game, driving etc – should be on point to win a golf tournament remains a hot subject, so we look at the winning statistics from the first four tournaments this season.

Departing from Paul Waring’s tweet this weekend about having led the field in strokes gained; driving, approach, short game and only to tie 18th and not win the Made in Denmark event, we scrutinise stats from the Zanaco Masters, the Mopani Redpath Greendoor Logistics and the Lombard Insurance Classic to note similarities in trends.

“So, I’ve led the field this week in: Strokes gained Driving Strokes gained Approach Strokes gained short-game. Finished tied 18th. Kids, if anybody says it’s not a putting competition they’re lying,” tweeted Waring.

In the opening event of the season, the Mopani Redpath Zambia Open, the eventual winner Daniel van Tonder’s driving accuracy was at 51.79% which meant he left himself some work to do in order to get to the greens. Despite that, he was able to reach 65.28 per cent of the greens in regulation, averaging 1.57 putts while averaging 1.68 putts on greens reached in regulation. The following week’s winner at the Zanaco Masters, JC Ritchie’s accuracy off the tee left a lot to be desired. With a driving accuracy of 44.64 %, Ritchie managed to hit 66% of greens in regulation and made an average 1.54 putts per greens in regulation, while runner-up, Rhys Enoch, and Merrick Bremner were the closest, each making 1.56 putts per greens in regulation that week.

On the occasion of his maiden Tour victory, at the Lombard Insurance Classic, Jake Redman put in a fine performance to break his duck and his numbers attest to this. Similar to Ritchie in a way, Redman’s accuracy off the tee was not as he would have liked – but rather decent – and he landed at the desired spot on 54.76 % of the times. His scrambling, however, proved pivotal in securing his maiden win because he reached 75% of the greens in regulation, enabling him to make 1.5 putts per greens in regulation.

While it is true that most aspects of one’s game must be sharp in order to even contend for a win in a professional golf tournament, it goes without saying that putting is key. The other aspects such as driving accuracy, distance and what not, are critical indeed, but ultimately, it is the putter which must be on song and the winners up to this point have shown this to be true.

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